Historical Berlin 

Berlin has a long and turbulent history, if you’re a history geek or not interested at all, it’s impossible to visit Berlin and not be reminded of what has happened here, I have listed some of my ‘must see’ attractions below. 

Brandenburg Tor (Gate), probably the most iconic view of Berlin, this used to be the official entrance to Berlin used by the Royal family. Now a meeting point for most tours. There is a free tour every day at 10am and 11am which leaves from the Starbucks opposite. There’s no need to book, just show up, if there are too many people for one tour then they just divide you up into groups.

Memorial to the murdered Jews of Europe, we spent about 15 minutes here on the free walking but we made a special effort to return here and spend longer, the artist who designed the memorial never announced what it was or what it was supposed to represent, he wasn’t visitors to really think about the different possible meanings and make up their own opinion.

Topography or Terror, one of the few pieces of the Berlin wall still standing, it’s been kept in its original state and is open to the public, there is a free museum next to the piece of wall which is open every day.

Gendarmenmarkt, a historical market square, the French cathedral is at one end and the German cathedral is at the other end. The French cathedral was a huge statement when it was first built, it was one of the first (if not the first) foreign church to be built in Germany, signalling that French migrants were welcome in Berlin.

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Berlin Dom (Cathedral), located on museum island and probably my favourite building in all of Berlin and we didn’t even need to go inside to appreciate its beauty. If I ever visit Berlin again then I will make time to see inside the cathedral for sure.

The memorial for the May 10th 1933 book burning opposite the university library. All books written by Jews, homosexuals, non-German authors etc. were burned on this spot in 1933. Now the memorial is an underground library with only bare shelves. There is a glass platform above ground to allow visitors a view of the memorial. Students sill line up outside the university every day selling second hand books to raise funds for charity as a direct response to the universities dark history. 

A quick note on the free tours, every tour is different and you don’t cover every single thing on this list. The tour guides don’t get paid so they rely heavily on tips, please be generous.

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Click HERE to read our Essential Information post about Berlin.

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Click HERE to read our Modern Day Berlin post.

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Cost and Useful Info – Berlin

Getting There: The flight from Newcastle (UK) is around 1 hour and 35 minutes, EasyJet fly regularly from loads of different cities in the UK. Our flights only cost £55/pp.

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Where To Stay: Arcadia Hotel Berlin, (only £40/night) right next to the Berlin Frankfurter Allee train station where you can take the S9 direct to the airport and opposite the underground, where the U5 is a short 7 minute journey to Alexanderplatz station in the city centre. The Arcadia is located in the Friedrichshain area which is quite and safe with a few nice restaurants and bars close by.

Getting Around: The main airport is SFX, about a 30-45 minute train ride from the city centre depending where you’re staying. A single ticket costs €3.40 or a day ticket which includes all the trams, busses and underground is €7.70. A single ticket for the underground is €2.80 and lasts 90 minutes, you can go as far as you want and change train as many times as you need to, all on the same ticket. They run regularly, cover the whole city and most lines are 24 hours.

Tours etc.: There are lots of ‘Free’ tours in Berlin, a quick google search will bring up a few different companies. I used http://www.freetoursbyfoot.com to book the classic Berlin tour and the alternative Berlin tour. The tours are free but the guides rely on tips to make a living, so be generous. See our ‘Berlin 3 day Itinerary’ for more details on the tours. Click HERE to read.

The river Spree is lined with dozens of boats trying to sell you a 1 hour tip, we chose the one which departed every 30 minutes from Moltkebrucke for €13/pp, but I got the impression that they were all similar prices and all follow the exact same route.

Food & Drink: The first thing I noticed is that water is expensive here, ranging from €1.80 to €3.00 for a normal size bottle. Food on the other hand is quite reasonable, for breakfast there were hundreds of bakeries selling croissants for less than €2.00. For lunch, there is a currywurst stall spread all over the city and you can buy one for less than €5. For dinner, a 2 course Italian meal for 2 people with wine cost us €40.



Visa: UK Passport holders do not currently need a visa to enter Germany.

Vaccinations: At the time of writing (June 2017) there are no vaccinations required.

Currency: The currency in Germany is Euro. It was really easy to find a cashpoint (ATM) and MasterCard is accepted in most places, even at underground (subway) stations.

£1 (GBP) = €1.14 (EUR)

£1 (USD) = €0.93 (EUR)

If you still have any questions, feel free to leave them in the comments section below:
Thanks for reading

Ashleigh xx